Art Reviews articles

Mindful is Engaging at MOCA

Mindful is Engaging at MOCA

By Betsy DiJulio The word “mindful” has become part of today’s lexicon verging on a trendy buzz word.  I first encountered it on my yoga mat, but it has eased out of yoga studios and begun to flow through society at large. At Virginia Beach’s MOCA, Mindful is the title of a new exhibition (shown

ART REVIEW: Stickwork is a Fantastical Fortress

By Betsy DiJulio Little boys build forts in the woods.  When they grow up, one of them at least builds fortresses. Although fortress isn’t quite the right term for what Patrick Doughtery builds.  Birds nest, indigenous tribe dwelling, boma, nor “folly”—those nonsensical structures erected on the estates of wealthy English and Scotsman—are exactly it either. 

ART REVIEW: Transforming Black & White

By Betsy DiJulio   Elegant and austere, Norwood Viviano’s gracefully attenuated and pendant and occasionally funnel-like “plumb bob” forms are, in fact, three-dimensional graphs of population growth and decline in 25 US cities from New York to Flint, Michigan, including Norfolk. The artist has transformed “black and white” census data into glossy black, smoky gray

East Meets West ‘80s Style

By Jerome Langston   Whether he is staring at the camera stoically, wearing mirrored sunglasses, or laughing with Keith Haring, Kenny Scharf, or Ann Magnuson at Danceteria, Tseng embodies the essence of the 1980s; not only its extravagant social life but also its attention to issues of identity and race. ― Amy Brandt, the Chrysler

McGinness and New Waves Shine at MOCA

By Betsy DiJulio “Ryan McGinness: Studio Visit” is a uniquely seductive concept for an exhibition, as visitors are made to feel as though we are walking through his studio space.  Organized by the VA Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, MOCA’s installation of the components makes it work beautifully. McGinness, a native son of Virginia

Inspirational Landscapes

By Betsy DiJulio   Intrigued that a show by an architect turned professional landscape painter—who also happens to play award-winning fiddle and banjo—was on view this winter at Virginia Wesleyan College’s Neil Britton Gallery and would be accompanied by a roots music concert series, I contacted curator and art professor, John Rudel, for details. From

Feast Upon TCC Faculty Art Exhibition

By Betsy DiJulio   Like an all-you-can-eat buffet, large group exhibitions are nothing if not diverse, especially non-juried ones.  Some of the offerings are tantalizing, even if not everyone’s taste, some have broad popular appeal, and some are easy to walk past, if not consciously avoid. The current faculty exhibition at TCC is no different. 

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